IMMIGRATION UPDATE 11.03.2023

Downtown San Diego from Coronado

IMMIGRATION UPDATE 11.03.2023

IMMIGRATION UPDATE – November 3, 2023

 

HEADLINES

Certain Renewal Applicants for Work Authorization Qualify for Automatic 180-Day Extension – U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services announced that certain renewal applicants who have filed Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization, qualify for an automatic extension of their expiring work authorization and/or employment authorization documents while their renewal applications are pending.

USCIS Updates Guidance on EB-5 Regional Center Program – U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services is updating the USCIS Policy Manual with new guidance on the EB-5 Regional Center Program and new content on regional center designation and obligations, project applications, and direct and third-party promoters.

USCIS Issues Guidance on 2-Year Foreign Residence Requirement for J Nonimmigrants – The update adds information about how U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services determines whether the requirement has been met, the evidence a benefit requestor may submit to show compliance with the requirement, and how USCIS considers situations in which it is effectively impossible for the benefit requestor to satisfy the requirement. It also corrects an omission from existing Policy Manual content concerning one of the grounds for waiving the foreign residence requirement for certain foreign medical graduates.

Reminder to Employers: Use New I-9 Form as of November 1 – The Citizenship and Immigration Services (CIS) Ombudsman emailed a reminder to employers to use the revised Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification, with the edition date 08/01/23, starting November 1, 2023.

State Dept. Intends to Resume Renewal of H-1B Nonimmigrant Visas in the United States for Certain Applicants – The Department of State intends to resume the renewal of H-1B nonimmigrant visas in the United States for certain applicants, beginning with a pilot program in early 2024, and has sent its proposal to the Office of Management and Budget for review.

DHS Plans to Amend H-1B Regulations Governing Specialty Occupation Workers – The Department of Homeland Security plans to amend its H-1B regulations “governing H–1B specialty occupation workers to modernize and improve the efficiency of the H–1B program, add benefits and flexibilities, and improve integrity measures.”

Visa-Free Travel to United States Is Now Available for Israelis – The Department of Homeland Security announced the start of visa-free travel for short-term visits to the United States for eligible Israeli citizens and nationals following Israel’s admission into the Visa Waiver Program. Eligible Israeli citizens and nationals can apply for authorization to travel to the United States through the U.S. Customs and Border Protection’s Electronic System for Travel Authorization.

USCIS Clarifies Guidance on L-1 Petitions for Intracompany Transferees Filed by Sole Proprietorships and on Blanket L Petitions – U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) issued policy guidance to clarify that a sole proprietorship may not file an L-1 petition on behalf of its owner because the sole proprietorship does not exist as a distinct legal entity separate and apart from the owner. The update also clarifies guidance regarding blanket L petitions.

DHS Announces Family Reunification Process for Ecuador – The Department of Homeland Security announced a new family reunification parole process for certain nationals of Ecuador that also allows for work authorization.

USCIS Launches New Online Change-of-Address Tool – U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has launched a new Enterprise Change of Address (E-COA) self-service tool to allow those with pending applications, petitions, or requests to update their addresses with USCIS online.

DOS Publishes DV-2025 Instructions, List of Countries – On October 3, 2023, the Department of State published instructions and eligibility requirements for the Diversity Visa (DV) program for fiscal year 2025 (DV-2025). The online registration period for the DV-2025 diversity visa program concludes on Tuesday, November 7, 2023, at 12 noon ET.

U.S. to Resume Direct Repatriation of Venezuelans Without Authorization – The Department of Homeland Security announced that it “will resume direct repatriations of Venezuelan nationals who cross our border unlawfully and do not establish a legal basis to remain.”

DHS to Extend and Redesignate Cameroon for Temporary Protected Status – The Department of Homeland Security will extend and redesignate Cameroon for Temporary Protected Status for 18 months, beginning on December 8, 2023, and ending on June 7, 2025.

DOS Announces U.S. Passport Processing Times, Tips – The Department of State announced that U.S. passport processing times have fluctuated several times in 2023. As of October 2, 2023, routine applications were being processed in eight to 11 weeks, and expedited applications in five to seven weeks, not including mailing time.

EAD Validity Period Increased for Certain Categories – U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services is increasing the maximum validity period to five years for initial and renewal Employment Authorization Documents (EADs) for certain noncitizens who are employment-authorized incident to status or circumstance, including those admitted as refugees, paroled as refugees, and granted asylum, as well as recipients of withholding of removal. USCIS is also increasing the maximum validity period to five years for initial and renewal EADs for certain noncitizens who must apply for employment authorization.

Biometric Services Fee Exempted for All Form I-539 Applicants – U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) is exempting the biometric services fee for Form I-539, Application to Extend/Change Nonimmigrant Status. Beginning October 1, 2023, applicants do not need to pay the $85 biometric services fee if their applications are postmarked October 1 or later.

 

DETAILS

Certain Renewal Applicants for Work Authorization Qualify for Automatic 180-Day Extension

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) announced that certain renewal applicants who have filed Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization, qualify for an automatic extension of their expiring work authorization and/or employment authorization documents (EADs) while their renewal applications are pending. As of October 27, 2023, those who are eligible “will receive 180-day extensions in accordance with existing regulations, including those who have applied for or have received Temporary Protected Status or asylum,” USCIS said.

The agency noted that in May 2022, it announced a temporary final rule (TFR) that increased the automatic extension period for EADs available to certain EAD renewal applicants from up to 180 days to up to 540 days. This new change is not retroactive, USCIS said; “all previous up to 540-day automatic extensions will remain in place.”

USCIS said it is determining whether there is a need for a new regulatory action similar to the May 2022 TFR.

As announced in the 2022 TFR, automatic extensions of employment authorization and EAD validity will be the original up to 180-day period for eligible applicants who timely file a Form I-765 renewal application on or after October 27, 2023. For those who received an increased automatic extension period under the TFR, the increased automatic extension will end when they receive a final decision on their renewal application or when the up to 540-day period expires (counted from the expiration date of the employment authorization and/or their EAD), whichever comes earlier.

USCIS also recently published a Policy Manual update increasing the maximum EAD validity period to five years for initial and renewal applications approved on or after September 27, 2023, for the following categories:

  • Certain noncitizens who are employment-authorized incident to status or circumstance, including those admitted as refugees, paroled as refugees, or granted asylum, and recipients of withholding of removal; and
  • Certain noncitizens who must apply for employment authorization, including applicants for asylum and withholding of removal, adjustment of status, and suspension of deportation or cancellation of removal.

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USCIS Updates Guidance on EB-5 Regional Center Program

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) announced on October 26, 2023, that it is “updating the USCIS Policy Manual with new guidance on the EB-5 Regional Center Program and new content on regional center designation and obligations, project applications, and direct and third-party promoters.”

USCIS said the update incorporates changes from the EB-5 Reform and Integrity Act of 2022 into the Policy Manual, building on an initial update that incorporated such changes on October 6, 2022.

Among other things, USCIS reorganized Part G, Volume 6, updated the chapter on adjudication of investor petitions for classification, and added new content on regional center designations and obligations, project applications, and direct and third-party promoters, including registration. USCIS said further updates to EB-5 guidance in the Policy Manual are forthcoming, and will include revisions to Chapter 5, Removal of Conditions.

USCIS said the new guidance “is effective immediately and is controlling, and supersedes any related prior guidance.”

 

USCIS Issues Guidance on 2-Year Foreign Residence Requirement for J Nonimmigrants

Effective October 24, 2023, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has issued policy guidance regarding the 2-year foreign residence requirement for the J nonimmigrant exchange visitor classification.

The update adds information about how USCIS determines whether the requirement has been met, the evidence a benefit requestor may submit to show compliance with the requirement, and how USCIS considers situations in which it is effectively impossible for the benefit requestor to satisfy the requirement. It also corrects an omission from existing Policy Manual content concerning one of the grounds for waiving the foreign residence requirement for certain foreign medical graduates. The update includes the ground and clarifies employment requirements.

Specifically, the update:

  • Clarifies that USCIS determines whether the exchange visitor has met the 2-year foreign residence requirement within the context of a subsequent application or petition under the preponderance of the evidence standard.
  • Explains that a travel day, where a fraction of the day is spent in the country of nationality or last residence, counts toward satisfaction of the 2-year foreign residence requirement.
  • Provides that USCIS considers situations in which it is impossible for the benefit requestor to satisfy the 2-year foreign residence requirement on a case-by-case basis, and that USCIS consults with the Department of State in this situation.
  • Clarifies the three exceptions to the requirement that a foreign medical graduate obtain a contract from a health care facility in an underserved area when seeking a waiver of the 2-year foreign residence requirement.

Feedback on this update can be emailed to USCIS at policyfeedback@uscis.dhs.gov.

 

Reminder to Employers: Use New I-9 Form as of November 1

The Citizenship and Immigration Services (CIS) Ombudsman reminded employers to use the revised Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification, with the edition date 08/01/23, starting November 1, 2023.

The updated Form I-9 reflects the option for eligible employers to verify employment eligibility remotely. The CIS Ombudsman said the revised edition is available now, and starting November 1, all previous versions will no longer be accepted. “If you do not use the 8/01/23 edition of Form I-9, you may be subject to penalties,” the CIS Ombudsman warned.

 

State Dept. Intends to Resume Renewal of H-1B Nonimmigrant Visas in the United States for Certain Applicants

The Department of State (DOS) intends to resume the renewal of H-1B nonimmigrant visas in the United States for certain applicants beginning with a pilot program in early 2024, and has sent its proposal to the Office of Management and Budget for review. Currently, the State Department can only process visa applications at its embassies and consular posts abroad and does not offer a stateside option for visa issuance.

Although full details have not yet been released, according to reports, in its initial phase the stateside visa renewal program is expected to be limited to H-1B principal visa applicants (not dependents). There will be additional eligibility requirements for participation (for example, the applicant must be renewing a visa issued within a limited number of years before the renewal submission), and the program will be voluntary—applicants will still have the option of obtaining visas abroad through regular processing.

The pilot program is expected to be limited to nationals of countries whose visas are not subject to reciprocity fees. India will be eligible for participation in the pilot program, as there is no applicable reciprocity fee. These fees vary in amount and are meant to equalize the cost of a visa for each country’s nationals with the fees charged by that country to U.S. nationals seeking comparable visas. Because the fees vary and must be refunded if a visa cannot be issued, including them in the pilot program could have delayed the rollout.

The program is intended to help reduce consular delays, which were exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic and have continued in certain locations. The pilot program will test the operational capacity of the stateside renewal program. Availability is expected to be capped at 20,000 applicants. If successful, the program will expand to other employment-based visa categories following its initial launch, although full implementation is likely to take some time.

 

DHS Plans to Amend H-1B Regulations Governing Specialty Occupation Workers

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) plans to amend its H-1B regulations “governing H–1B specialty occupation workers to modernize and improve the efficiency of the H–1B program, add benefits and flexibilities, and improve integrity measures.” The notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM), expected to be published in the Federal Register on October 23, 2023, would also “narrowly impact other nonimmigrant classifications, including: H-2, H-3, F-1, L-1, O, P, Q-1, R-1, E-3, and TN.” A 60-day public comment period starts following publication of the NPRM in the Federal Register.

Below is a non-exhaustive summary of highlights. DHS proposes to:

  1. Revise the regulatory definition and criteria for a “specialty occupation” and clarify that a position may allow a range of degrees if they have a direct relationship to the duties of the position;
  2. Clarify when an amended or new petition must be filed due to a change in an H-1B worker’s place of employment;
  3. Codify and clarify that if there has been no material change in the underlying facts, adjudicators generally should defer to a prior determination involving the same parties and underlying facts;
  4. Require evidence of maintenance of status to be included with the petition if a beneficiary is seeking an extension or amendment of stay;
  5. Change the definition of “nonprofit research organization” and “governmental research organization” by replacing “primarily engaged” and “primary mission” with “fundamental activity” to permit a nonprofit entity or governmental research organization that conducts research as a fundamental activity, but is not primarily engaged in research or where research is not a primary mission, to meet the definition of a nonprofit research entity;
  6. Provide flexibilities, such as automatically extending the duration of F-1 status, and any employment authorization granted under 8 CFR 274a.12(c)(3)(i)(B) or (C), until April 1 of the relevant fiscal year, rather than October 1 of the same fiscal year, to avoid disruptions in lawful status and employment authorization for F-1 students changing their status to H-1B;
  7. Clarify the requirements regarding the requested employment start date on H–1B cap-subject petitions to permit filing with requested start dates that are after October 1 of the relevant fiscal year;
  8. Select H-1B cap registrations by unique beneficiary rather than by registration;
  9. Clarify that related entities are prohibited from submitting multiple registrations for the same beneficiary;
  10. Clarify that beneficiary-owners may be eligible for H-1B status, while setting reasonable conditions for when the beneficiary owns a controlling interest in the petitioning entity; and
  11. Clarify that if an H-1B worker will be staffed to a third party, meaning they will be contracted to fill a position in the third party’s organization, it is the requirements of that third party, and not the petitioner, that are most relevant when determining whether the position is a specialty occupation.

 

  • USCIS notice of proposed rulemaking (advance copy), 88 Fed. Reg. 72870 (Oct. 23, 2023).
  • USCIS news release (Oct. 20, 2023).

 

Visa-Free Travel to United States Is Now Available for Israelis

On October 19, 2023, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced the start of visa-free travel for short-term visits to the United States for eligible Israeli citizens and nationals following Israel’s admission into the Visa Waiver Program (VWP). Eligible Israeli citizens and nationals can apply for authorization to travel to the United States through the U.S. Customs and Border Protection’s (CBP) Electronic System for Travel Authorization (ESTA).

This authorization allows eligible Israelis to travel to the United States for tourism or business purposes for up to 90 days without first obtaining a U.S. visa. Israeli citizens and nationals with valid B-1/B-2 visas may continue to use them for business and tourist travel to the United States, DHS said.

DHS explained that eligible Israeli citizens and nationals must have a biometrically enabled passport book. Travelers who possess non-biometric, temporary, or emergency travel documents, or travel documents from a non-VWP designated country, are not eligible for travel under the VWP and may instead apply for a U.S. visa. ESTA applications may take up to 72 hours for processing. The ESTA application will be available in English now and in other languages by November 1, 2023, DHS said.

 

USCIS Clarifies Guidance on L-1 Petitions for Intracompany Transferees Filed by Sole Proprietorships and on Blanket L Petitions

On October 20, 2023, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) issued policy guidance to clarify that a sole proprietorship may not file an L-1 petition on behalf of its owner because the sole proprietorship does not exist as a distinct legal entity separate and apart from the owner.

The USCIS guidance further clarifies that an L-1 petition where the owner and beneficiary are the same constitutes an impermissible self-petition. The update also clarifies guidance regarding blanket L petitions, noting that the failure to timely file an extension of the blanket petition does not trigger the three-year waiting period before another blanket petition may be filed.

 

DHS Announces Family Reunification Process for Ecuador

On October 18, 2023, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced a new family reunification parole process for certain nationals of Ecuador that also allows for work authorization. The new process is for certain nationals of Ecuador whose family members are U.S. citizens or lawful permanent residents and who have received approval to join their family in the United States. Specifically, Ecuadorian nationals and their immediate family members can be considered for parole on a case-by-case basis for up to three years while waiting to apply to become lawful permanent residents.

Individuals paroled into the United States under this process will generally be considered for parole for up to three years and will be eligible to request work authorization while they wait for their immigrant visa to become available, DHS said. When their immigrant visa becomes available, they may apply to become a lawful permanent resident.

Qualifying beneficiaries must be outside the United States; must meet all requirements, including screening and vetting and medical requirements; and must not have already received an immigrant visa.

 

USCIS Launches New Online Change-of-Address Tool

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has launched a new Enterprise Change of Address (E-COA) self-service tool to allow those with pending applications, petitions, or requests to update their addresses with USCIS online.

USCIS said that with E-COA, most individuals with a USCIS online account can update their mailing and physical addresses with USCIS for pending applications, petitions, or requests in a single place, eliminating the need to update the address in multiple places; fill out a paper AR-11, Alien’s Change of Address Card; call the Contact Center; or visit a USCIS Field or Asylum Office. E-COA will automate address changes for almost all form types. The exceptions are listed at uscis.gov/addresschange.

 

DOS Publishes DV-2025 Instructions, List of Countries

On October 3, 2023, the Department of State (DOS) published instructions and eligibility requirements for the Diversity Visa (DV) program for fiscal year (FY) 2025 (DV-2025). The online registration period for the DV-2025 diversity visa program began on Wednesday, October 4, 2023, and concludes on Tuesday, November 7, 2023, at 12 noon ET.

For FY 2025, up to 55,000 DVs will be available. The Electronic Diversity Visa Entry Form (E-DV Entry Form or DS-5501) is available online at dvprogram.state.gov. DOS will not accept incomplete entries or entries sent by any other means. There is no cost to register for the DV program, but selectees who are scheduled for an interview must pay a visa application fee before making their formal visa application where a consular officer will determine whether they qualify for the visa. DOS determines selectees through a randomized computer drawing.

Except for the United Kingdom and its dependent territories, which are now eligible for the DV–2025 program, there were no changes in eligibility from the previous fiscal year. For DV–2025, natives of the following countries and areas are not eligible to apply, because more than 50,000 natives of these countries immigrated to the United States in the previous five years: Bangladesh, Brazil, Canada, The People’s Republic of China (including mainland and Hong Kong born), Colombia, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Haiti, Honduras, India, Jamaica, Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan, Philippines, Republic of Korea (South Korea), Venezuela, and Vietnam. Natives of Macau SAR and Taiwan are eligible.

 

DOS Restores Previous Version of Regulation Governing Public Charge Grounds of Visa Ineligibility

The Department of State (DOS) announced on October 6, 2023, that its regulation governing the public charge grounds of visa ineligibility has been restored to the version that was in place before October 11, 2019.

On October 11, 2019, DOS published an interim final rule (IFR) that substantially revised the regulations governing the grounds. The IFR was enjoined by the District Court for the Southern District of New York on July 29, 2020, DOS explained. Since that time, the agency has used Foreign Affairs Manual (FAM) guidance that was in place before publication of the IFR.

“The IFR was intended to align with the standards then applied by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to determine inadmissibility on public charge grounds. In 2022, DHS published a new Final Rule. As such, the IFR no longer meets the policy aim of consistency with DHS standards. In reverting to regulatory text that was in place prior to the publication of the IFR, the Department is again more closely aligned with the current DHS standards,” DOS explained.

 

U.S. to Resume Direct Repatriation of Venezuelans Without Authorization

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced on October 5, 2023, that it “will resume direct repatriations of Venezuelan nationals who cross our border unlawfully and do not establish a legal basis to remain.”

DHS said this announcement “follows a decision by authorities from Venezuela to accept the return of Venezuelan nationals, as well as high-level discussions yesterday in Mexico City between the United States, Mexico, Colombia, and Panama where Secretary of State Antony Blinken, Secretary of Homeland Security Alejandro N. Mayorkas, and Homeland Security Advisor Liz Sherwood-Randall discussed ongoing coordinated efforts to address irregular migration in the Western Hemisphere.”

 

DHS to Extend and Redesignate Cameroon for Temporary Protected Status

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) will extend and redesignate Cameroon for Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for 18 months, beginning on December 8, 2023, and ending on June 7, 2025.

Existing TPS beneficiaries who wish to extend their status through June 7, 2025, must re-register during the 60-day re-registration period, which is expected to begin on October 10, 2023. The redesignation of Cameroon also allows additional Cameroonian nationals (and individuals having no nationality who last habitually resided in Cameroon) who have been continuously residing in the United States since October 5, 2023, to apply for TPS for the first time during the initial registration period, which is expected to begin on October 10, 2023.

DHS said, “It is important for re-registrants to timely re-register during the registration period and not to wait until their Employment Authorization Documents (EADs) expire, as delaying re-registration could result in gaps in their employment authorization documentation.”

  • DHS Extension and Redesignation of Cameroon for Temporary Protected Status (advance copy).

 

DOS Announces U.S. Passport Processing Times, Tips

The Department of State (DOS) announced that U.S. passport processing times have fluctuated several times in 2023. As of October 2, 2023, routine applications were being processed in eight to 11 weeks, and expedited applications in five to seven weeks. Processing times do not include mailing time.

DOS said that between October 2022 and September 2023, DOS issued more than 24 million passport books and cards, the most in U.S. history. DOS encourages applicants to check the status of their passport application and sign up for updates via email.

DOS also released the following tips for U.S. passport applicants:

  1. If you’re renewing your application, submit your most recent passport with your application. Sign and date Form DS-82.
  2. Complete all sections of your form including entering your correct Social Security number. Do not leave anything blank. If you’re applying for the first time or with your child under age 16, wait to sign the form until you are instructed to do so. If you’re renewing by mail, sign and date the form on your own.
  3. Closely follow the passport photo requirements.
  4. Provide evidence of U.S. citizenship.
  5. If your current name is not the same as the name on your most recent passport, include your name change document (such as marriage certificate, divorce decree, or court order).

 

EAD Validity Period Increased for Certain Categories

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) announced on September 27, 2023, that it is increasing the maximum validity period to five years for initial and renewal Employment Authorization Documents (EADs) for certain noncitizens who are employment-authorized incident to status or circumstance, including those admitted as refugees, paroled as refugees, and granted asylum, as well as recipients of withholding of removal.

USCIS is also increasing the maximum validity period to five years for initial and renewal EADs for certain noncitizens who must apply for employment authorization, including applicants for asylum or withholding of removal, adjustment of status under INA § 245, and suspension of deportation or cancellation of removal.

The agency noted that its updated guidance also explains the categories of noncitizens who are automatically authorized to work (also known as being employment-authorized incident to status or circumstance) and provides information on who can present a Form I-94, Arrival/Departure Record, to an employer as an acceptable document showing employment authorization under List C of Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification. The guidance also clarifies that certain Afghan and Ukrainian parolees are employment-authorized incident to parole.

USCIS noted that whether the noncitizen maintains employment authorization remains dependent on their underlying status, circumstances, and EAD filing category. For example, USCIS said, “if an individual received an EAD under the (c)(9) category based on a pending adjustment of status application for the maximum validity period of 5 years, and the adjustment application is then denied, their ancillary employment authorization may be terminated before the expiration date listed on their EAD.”

 

Biometric Services Fee Exempted for All Form I-539 Applicants

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) announced on September 25, 2023, that it is exempting the biometric services fee for Form I-539, Application to Extend/Change Nonimmigrant Status. Beginning October 1, 2023, applicants do not need to pay the $85 biometric services fee.

Certain filers who filed before October 1 will still be scheduled for, and should attend, an ASC appointment. In most cases, after October 1, applicants will not be scheduled to attend a biometric services appointment. However, if USCIS determines that biometrics are required, the applicant will receive a notice with information about appearing for their biometric services appointment, the agency noted.

USCIS warned:

If you mistakenly submit the biometric services fee and the payment is submitted separately from the Form I-539 fee, we will return the biometric services fee and accept the Form I-539. If you mistakenly submit the biometric services fee and the payment is combined with a paper-based Form I-539 filing fee, this is considered an incorrect filing and we will reject the Form I-539. If you mistakenly authorize a credit card payment that combines the biometric services fee with the Form I-539 application fee, we will accept the application, and only charge the application fee.

USCIS said the biometric services fee exemption will apply to all applicants filing on or after October 1, 2023, including those applicants filing Form I-539 requesting an extension of stay in, or change of status to, H-4, L-2, or E nonimmigrant for whom USCIS had previously suspended the biometrics requirement through September 30, 2023.


IMMIGRATION AGENCY INFORMATION/PROCESSING TIMES

U.S. Customs and Border Protection:          

Accessing I-94 Information: https://i94.cbp.dhs.gov/I94/#/home

I-9/ E-Verify webinar schedule:  https://www.e-verify.gov/calendar-field_date_and_time/month

Department of Labor:           

PERM and Prevailing Wage Processing Times: https://flag.dol.gov/processingtimes

State Department:

Visa Appointment Wait Times: https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/us-visas.html

Monthly Immigrant Visa Bulletin: https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/legal/visa-law0/visa-bulletin.html

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services:

Processing Times:  https://egov.uscis.gov/processing-times/

Case Status Online:  https://egov.uscis.gov/

AGENCY TWITTER ACCOUNTS

  • EOIR: @DOJ_EOIR
  • ICE: @ICEgov
  • Study in the States: @StudyinStates
  • USCIS: @USCIS

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This newsletter was prepared in collaboration with ABIL, the Alliance of Business Immigration Lawyers, comprised of twenty U.S. immigration lawyers who head some of the top immigration practices in the country.   Larrabee Albi Coker LLP is an active member of ABIL.

Legal Disclaimer:   This newsletter is provided for informational purposes only and does not substitute for legal advice based on the circumstances of a specific matter.

 

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